Monday, July 22, 2013

Liza visits Karen Y Bynum's Blog

Today, I supposed to be at Karen Y Bynum's Blog. where I talk about the ingredients needed to make such a God-awful bad boy.

But the title of my book has once again attracted the digital demons and my post is yet up. (It's probably hanging about in DRAFT.)

So I'm putting it up here until we can right this matter. (Any comments made here WILL be entered to win the seven prizes.)

HOW TO MAKE A GOD-AWFUL BAD BOY BOSS



The way I make any character is to pull the ingredients from real life experiences.

So these are the experiences that helped create Trent.

Experience #1:

Worst Boss Ever: 

I once worked for the meanest man on Wall Street. (Everyone who knew him claimed this--not just me). And yes, he was a billionaire. While he didn't technically own Paine Webber or even run the NYC division, he behaved like he did. If anyone dared get in his way, refused his demands, or complained because he had stolen their clients, they would be gone within a month.
 Satan would have been more pleasant to work for.
He was the first 'real' boss I had. I was hired because I was southern, with a positive work ethic, and somehow HR hoped that meant I would be able to charm him, where as NYC girls just said 'Screw This" and left ten minutes into the job.

I did try harder. It took me two years to come to reason and say, Liza, you have skills now. You are battle scarred enough. Anyone will be a nicer boss. Jack the Ripper would be a nicer boss.

Due to the stress of the job & personal life, I'd been dropping weight until I looked like a poster child for Anorexia. So I called my former head hunter and got an after-work interview, met two partners of another firm who were very impressed that I had worked for the meanest man on Wall Street for two years. They hired me on the spot. The next Monday I went in and let Satan's Master know due to health reasons, I had to stop working for him. His reply: No. I'll be nicer. You can't quit.

During the next week, he screamed and bellowed at everyone else, then talk to me like a fireman trying to talk a frightened kitten from a tree. It was beyond creepy.  On Friday, he called me in. "You're staying, right?"

"No, Gary. I'm still leaving. This job is killing me, literally."

His eyes narrowed in fury. "You have another job lined up, don't you."

The hairs on the back of my neck rose. My self-preservation was screaming 'Run Bambi, Run!"
"I have to work, I just can work here anymore."

"Get out!" he screamed. "Get the hell out, now."

I bolted to the door, got through it and had it partially closed when the first client record book hit the door. When another book slammed against the closed door, I looked at the my fellow assistant. "I won't be coming in next week. Sorry to leave you short-handed." Then I gathered my stuff and headed for the long journey home to NJ.



Experience Two: 

Worst Boyfriend Ever

The other toxic poison that I threw into my brew was the worst boyfriend I have ever had.
I didn't like him when we first met. In fact, my very first thought, before I even knew his name, was JERK.

He'd opened his beer can and spewed it all over me. He was a bitter rich kid with parents who didn't like him much. He was petulant, arrogant, and selfish and of all the guys flirting with me on the communal porch to my new apartment, he was my least favorite. Yes, he was good-looking, but so was the brother of the owner of the apartments, and he was so much nicer. So I had my eye on him.
Turned out that was like a red flag to a bull for JERK. He loved stealing girls from his friend. So when I was asked to go out barhopping with them, I called a girlfriend and we went. 3 guys, 2 girls. Could it get any better than that? I of course hoped to hook up with the nice cute guy. My friend would hook up with the other nice guy and JERK could wander off on his own. Unfortunately, that's not what happened. JERK became all charms and compliment and convinced me I had completely misread his character. He was delightful, fun, and sexy as hell.

So I fell in love with the good parts of him, and tried not to focus on the bad parts, which were still there. (So much like poor Carrie does with Trent.)
I was still with the JERK as I was dealing with the worst boss ever. According to my diaries at the time, I thought myself in love with the JERK. I don't see how that was possible. I think I just wanted to be in love with someone, and to have someone love me. I don't think I even understood what love really was. That comes from seeing it in your life. (My parents hated one another) or being lucky enough to discover it on your own.

Result: Psychotic Killer-Opps!


Unfortunately, the ingredients from these two characters make a toxic mixture that would be great for a psychotic killer, but way too bad for a bad boy. So I pulled traits from my best boyfriend ever and funny stupid antics from my dumbest boss to create Trent.

I also blame a great deal of Trent's problems on his horrible parents (something a person can recover from) and having too much money, (which IMO is harder to overcome.) After meeting a great deal of the 1%ers, I am convinced having too much money is toxic to the soul. It takes a very strong character to survive excessive wealth. It's especially hard on the later generations.

By adding these funny and positive traits, in the end, I have bad boy that is capable of becoming a good man. However, realistically, it's going to take more than week, which means he's not quite there come the end of book one.) And honestly, success isn't guaranteed. If anything falls against him, he could so easily revert to his comfort zone of a God-awful Bad Boy.

Yes, it would have been easier to make him a nicer person, but hey, look on the bright side. Had I not added qualities from my best boyfriend, poor Carrie would have been falling in love with a psychotic killer. And don't tell me that never happens, because it does. Just google it. 


Thankfully, that's not in my life experiences.


Stop by, have a laugh, lose all respect for me and possibly win some money.
Want to increase your chances of winning a prize?

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