Friday, March 14, 2014

Melissa Keir asks What would you do without teachers?

What Would You Do Without Teachers?


Teachers have come under fire in recent years about the “dumbing down” of America. The United States no-longer has the top students in the world, especially in Math and Science. Teachers are over-paid, with too many days off, and don’t provide engaging lessons where students can learn. 

It’s all the teacher’s fault.

But my question for you would be, where would the world be without teachers? 

When I was in college, they were talking about robotic teachers or computer teachers where each student could be logged in on a computer and learn at their own pace at their own time. The students would engage with only a computer. We also had classes that were given by video feed. A group of students sit together in a classroom to watch a video feed of a teacher from another location. Students are able to interact with the teacher through the simultanious video feed. While these might be some wonderful opportunities for older students, I don’t see how this will work at the elementary level.



Are parents willing to let robots or nanny cams be the driving force in their child’s lives? I know it’s hard on snow days when the school closes for safety or to see a teacher getting summer’s off, but I also know most parents go crazy after one snow day with their three children, imagine how it would be to have 20-40 students who are unable to go outside because of wind chill or rain, trapped in a classroom for days on end. Do you know how to make each and every lesson engaging and interesting to all the different students in a class? Most parents tell me on a daily basis that they couldn’t do my job, even for a million dollars. Teachers aren’t perfect and there are many who are horrible teachers, but I can’t imagine a child left in a box all day or only interacting on a computer. Facial expressions and body language tell us so much and children learn to read them from teachers.



Computers can’t teach a child to tie their shoes. It can’t give a hug when the child isn’t feeling well. It can’t pick a child up when they slip on icy walks or teach them how to enjoy a subject that they find challenging. All those personal things are being done by teachers every day. Teachers are also spending their own money to buy supplies for their classroom, teaching children how to get along with others as well as bandaging boo-boos.

Teachers’ earn their money by wiping runny noses, forming lasting bonds with students and falling in love with your children. In many cases, they spend more time with your child on a daily basis than parents do. They become second parents, sounding boards and provide moral compasses for children who need to be loved.
Where would we be without teachers?   


Maybe we will be smarter, or more tech-savvy, but we won’t be as friendly or as personable. Our social skills and communication would decrease. Those key traits that help us solve problems and get along with others.
I’m off to hug all my students and thank their parents for giving me the chance to become important in their child’s life.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Chalkboard Romance tells the tale of a one night stand that causes ripples throught the small town community when elementary teacher, Lauren Walsh falls for Mac Thomas, a parent of one of her students.



Lauren Walsh, a divorcee and elementary teacher, wanted to feel sexy again, after her ex tossed her aside for a younger woman. Her teaching partner and best friend encouraged her to sign up for The Playhouse--a renowned dating agency.

Mac Thomas remained trapped in a marriage to a money grubbing socialite. Forced to stay away from his young son, Mac lost the ability to trust. After the death of his wife, he returned to care for his son but his sister wants more for him. She sets him up with The Playhouse.

Passion ignites but Mac’s a parent of one of Lauren’s students. A teacher and a parent dating could cost Lauren her job and her chance at happiness. Will Mac be able to convince the school and Lauren, that love is the most important thing?


About the Author:   
Melissa Keir has always wanted to be an author when
she wasn’t hoping for a career as a race car driver.  Her love of books was instilled by her mother and grandparents who were avid readers. She’d often sneak books away from them so that she could fantasize about those strong alpha males and plucky heroines.  In middle school and high school, Melissa used to write sappy love poems and shared them with her friends and still has those poems today! In college her writing changed to sarcastic musings on life as well as poems with a modern twist on fairy tales and won awards for her writing. You can find many of these musings along with her latest releases on her website and blog. 

As a writer, Melissa likes to keep current on topics of interest in the world of writing.  She’s a member of the Romance Writers of America, Mid-Michigan RWA Chapter, and EPIC.  She is always interested in improving her writing through classes and seminars.  

Melissa doesn’t believe in down time.  She’s always keeping busy.  Melissa is a wife and mother, an elementary school teacher, a book reviewer, an editor for a publishing company as well as an author. Her home blends two families and is a lot like the Brady Bunch, without Alice- a large grocery bill, tons of dirty dishes and a mound of laundry. She loves to write stories that feature happy endings and is often seen plotting her next story.



22 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you D'Ann for stopping by!

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    2. This was all Melissa. My only brilliance was to suggest the topic.

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    3. It was a good idea. :) And very timely!

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  2. The world needs more wonderful teachers and higher pay. Tweeted :)

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  3. Great post! Book sounds awesome! Great excerpt too!

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  4. Thank you Liza for letting me stop by and share! :)

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    1. I'll be keeping you 3 days, so stop by on occasion. It was a pleasure having you. You did an excellent job on your assignment. A+

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  5. LOL Love the post it note car. :)

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    1. Once Nicole when I was in college, I had to dissect a cow's eyeball. It was so funny that I hung it in a bag from the instructor's antenna. He got a kick out of it. I can only imagine some of the things that happen to teachers' cars.

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    2. At my school, they had to guard the teacher's cars in a locked fenced in area. For some reason, I got permission to park in there, so my car was protected as well. I can't remember why. I can really piss people off. Now I'll be pondering that all night. Why did I have to protect my car? Who wished to harm it? What did I do to royally piss them off? It's a complete blank. I can only remember my happiness and relief when I got to park my car in the guarded lot my senior year.

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    3. Nicole, I love the post its too. I wonder how many packets they went through. The Teachers at my school were so frugal they would have pulled them off and turned them back into post it stacks.

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    4. Now that's funny! It's not that we are frugal but we know the admins are NEVER getting us those things. Too expensive for teachers.

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  6. Teachers and emergency personnel (police, fire, military) are certainly underpaid. I may not agree with the Common Core Standards crap that's going on, but I do love the looks of your book, Melissa!!! Congratulations :)

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    1. Thank you Sheri. I'm not sure I agree about the Common Core stuff going on. We spend a lot of time and money changing things but the people who do the changes aren't the teachers.

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  7. Teachers work hard and are dedicated...sometimes parents forget this and dump their responsibilities of raising their kids to teachers. Parents need to show more respect for teachers, and then their kids will. Teachers give that human quality called nurturing to students...robots can't do that.
    Overpaid? I was never wealthy as a teacher. And, I used my own money for supplies the school system didn't purchase. There seems to be less respect for teachers, and more catering to parents who coddle their kids. We should expect more from students, not water-down learning.

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    1. I love the way you said it Marianne. I'm sure there are some teachers who are wealthy, but maybe those are the few. I have a lower pay, no retirement and while I do have healthcare, there's a high deductible. I'm doing it for the love of those children.

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    2. If you judge fair pay by the importance of a job and the value to society, then teachers are probably the most underpaid workers in America.

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