Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Jenna Jaxon shares a pictorial delight & Only Marriage Will Do


Marriage a la Mode:  

Marriage in the Eighteenth Century 

According to William Hogarth


Marriage was a hot topic during the 18th century. Most marriages during the early part of the century were arranged affairs rather than affairs of the heart. William Hogarth, an artist famous for his satirical engravings, such as The Rake’s Progress, created a series of engraving depicting marriage “a la mode” or in the current fashion. It is a brilliant indictment of the institution of the time.
The series of six engravings begins with “The Marriage Settlement” where Earl Squander is hashing out the business contract for the marriage of his son, a Viscount, to the daughter of a wealthy merchant. The groom is looking at himself in a mirror; the bride is conferring with a lawyer (Silvertongue).
The second scene, “The Tete-a-Tete,” shows the marriage already in trouble. The wife has held an all-night entertainment at their home, now symbolically disordered. The husband has just returned from a night of carousing (he has a woman’s cap in his pocket). Their steward is leaving carrying a sheaf of bills to be paid.
Scene three is “The Inspection,” where the Viscount is seeking a cure for venereal disease (depicted by the black spot on his neck) from a doctor. He holds out a box of mercury pills, the only known treatment during the 18th century. The young girl beside him is his mistress.
In scene four, “The Toilette,” the old Earl has died and the wife is now a countess, shown by the coronet over her bed and dressing table. She is fashionably attended by an opera singer and several guests, including her lawyer, Silvertongue, who is apparently tempting her to attend a masquerade party. The squandering of Earl’s money can be noted by the African page who is unpacking “curiosities” the countess has bought.
The fifth scene is set in “The Bagnio,” the 18th century equivalent of a “no-tell motel,” where the wife has been discovered with the lawyer after the masquerade they attended. Her husband is dying, having been wounded by Silvertongue, who is fleeing through the window. The wife begs forgiveness.
In the final scene, “The Lady’s Death,” the countess has taken poison after reading that her lover, Silvertongue, has been hanged for the murder of the Earl.
Fortunately, by the middle of the century, the tide began to turn and women especially began to look for marriages based on affection rather than finances.



 FOR ONLY MARRIAGE WILL DO
Not every happy-ever-after begins at “I do.”
When the hero of her dreams rescues Lady Juliet Ferrers from the man claiming to be her husband, she is sure she has found her one true love.  But is she free to marry him?  Not to be deterred, Juliet arranges for her hero, Captain Amiable Dawson, to escort her to her family estate, hoping that along the way she can win his love. 
Amiable is charmed by the sweet, beautiful woman he rescued, and although he has grave reservations about her marital status, he allows himself to be swept up into Juliet’s romantic spell and the promise of a happy-ever-after. 


The spell breaks when legal questions arise and Juliet faces the horror of not knowing if she is married to her knight in shining armor or the cruel viscount who is determined to have her at any price.


At the touch of his fingers on her cheek, Juliet lost her battle with the tears. She had sworn not to shed a single one over him, but now they flooded her face as the ache in her chest reached a terrible crescendo.
“Juliet, my dear.”
As the first sob tore from her throat, he scooped her up, bore her over to the parlor’s sofa, and settled her in his lap. “Juliet, do not cry, my love. You break my heart.”
He pressed her head to his chest, heedless of the torrent that soaked into his jacket.
She could not stop, however. The misery at what she intended to do overwhelmed her. She must send him away, she must.
Her cries intensified, banishment from Amiable a sentence too terrible to contemplate. The pain cut so deep for a brief moment she wished to die just to escape it. Finally, she managed to stem the tide to a trickle. Soul-wrenching grief gave way to bleak despair. She lay exhausted on his broad chest, too tired now to even move her head.
“My dear,” he spoke quietly into her ear. “What has happened to make you so unhappy?”
She struggled up, trying to catch her breath. She risked a glance at him and wished she hadn’t. Tears threatened again. “I…I c-came to tell you I no longer r-require your services as escort, Captain Dawson.” There. She had said it. “You may return to London on the morrow, sir.”
“I see.” He held her steady with one hand while the other pushed back a stray wisp of hair straggling from her coiffure. “That would be a most prudent move.” He captured another escaping strand and stroked it into place behind her ear, then wiped her tears away with his thumb.
Could he not see her misery? Would he add to it with his kindness? Such attentions made it almost impossible to continue with her resolve.
“However, I do not think I will go, my lady, if it is all the same to you.”
She fought to keep her composure. “I, however, no longer require your escort, sir. I will journey on alone.”
Amiable smiled patiently but shook his head. “I fear not, my dear.”
“I will.” She tried to pull away from his grasp but he held her still.
“Most definitely not.” He wrapped his hand around the back of her head, urging her face closer to his.
“Wh—what are you doing, Captain Dawson?” His blue eyes were her whole world.
“Bowing to the inevitable, my love.” Then his mouth met hers.







Jenna Jaxon is a multi-published author of historical and contemporary romance.  She has been reading and writing historical romance since she was a teenager.  A romantic herself, she has always loved a dark side to the genre, a twist, suspense, a surprise.  She tries to incorporate all of these elements into her own stories. She lives in Virginia with her family and a small menagerie of pets.  When not reading or writing, she indulges her passion for the theatre, working with local theatres as a director.  She often feels she is directing her characters on their own private stage.

Jenna is a PAN member of Romance Writers of America as well as President of Chesapeake Romance Writers, her local chapter of RWA. Her debut novel, Only Scandal Will Do, is the first in her House of Pleasure series, set in Georgian London. Only Marriage Will Do, the second book in the series, is set to release in mid-June 2015 from Kensington. Her medieval serial novel, Time Enough to Love: Betrothal, Betrayal, and Beleaguered, is a Romeo & Juliet-esque tale, set at the time of the Black Death. The companion short story, Beloveds, released in early June 2015.  And a time travel novella, Crashing Through Time, will release in early July as part of a boxed set about seven plane crashes that lead to love called Crashing Into Love.

She has equated her writing to an addiction to chocolate because once she starts she just can’t stop.


Find Jenna Jaxon online:



Marriage a la Mode:  

Marriage in the Eighteenth Century 

According to William Hogarth


Marriage was a hot topic during the 18th century. Most marriages during the early part of the century were arranged affairs rather than affairs of the heart. William Hogarth, an artist famous for his satirical engravings, such as The Rake’s Progress, created a series of engraving depicting marriage “a la mode” or in the current fashion. It is a brilliant indictment of the institution of the time.
The series of six engravings begins with “The Marriage Settlement” where Earl Squander is hashing out the business contract for the marriage of his son, a Viscount, to the daughter of a wealthy merchant. The groom is looking at himself in a mirror; the bride is conferring with a lawyer (Silvertongue).
The second scene, “The Tete-a-Tete,” shows the marriage already in trouble. The wife has held an all-night entertainment at their home, now symbolically disordered. The husband has just returned from a night of carousing (he has a woman’s cap in his pocket). Their steward is leaving carrying a sheaf of bills to be paid.
Scene three is “The Inspection,” where the Viscount is seeking a cure for venereal disease (depicted by the black spot on his neck) from a doctor. He holds out a box of mercury pills, the only known treatment during the 18th century. The young girl beside him is his mistress.
In scene four, “The Toilette,” the old Earl has died and the wife is now a countess, shown by the coronet over her bed and dressing table. She is fashionably attended by an opera singer and several guests, including her lawyer, Silvertongue, who is apparently tempting her to attend a masquerade party. The squandering of Earl’s money can be noted by the African page who is unpacking “curiosities” the countess has bought.
The fifth scene is set in “The Bagnio,” the 18th century equivalent of a “no-tell motel,” where the wife has been discovered with the lawyer after the masquerade they attended. Her husband is dying, having been wounded by Silvertongue, who is fleeing through the window. The wife begs forgiveness.
In the final scene, “The Lady’s Death,” the countess has taken poison after reading that her lover, Silvertongue, has been hanged for the murder of the Earl.
Fortunately, by the middle of the century, the tide began to turn and women especially began to look for marriages based on affection rather than finances.



 FOR ONLY MARRIAGE WILL DO
Not every happy-ever-after begins at “I do.”
When the hero of her dreams rescues Lady Juliet Ferrers from the man claiming to be her husband, she is sure she has found her one true love.  But is she free to marry him?  Not to be deterred, Juliet arranges for her hero, Captain Amiable Dawson, to escort her to her family estate, hoping that along the way she can win his love. 
Amiable is charmed by the sweet, beautiful woman he rescued, and although he has grave reservations about her marital status, he allows himself to be swept up into Juliet’s romantic spell and the promise of a happy-ever-after. 


The spell breaks when legal questions arise and Juliet faces the horror of not knowing if she is married to her knight in shining armor or the cruel viscount who is determined to have her at any price.


At the touch of his fingers on her cheek, Juliet lost her battle with the tears. She had sworn not to shed a single one over him, but now they flooded her face as the ache in her chest reached a terrible crescendo.
“Juliet, my dear.”
As the first sob tore from her throat, he scooped her up, bore her over to the parlor’s sofa, and settled her in his lap. “Juliet, do not cry, my love. You break my heart.”
He pressed her head to his chest, heedless of the torrent that soaked into his jacket.
She could not stop, however. The misery at what she intended to do overwhelmed her. She must send him away, she must.
Her cries intensified, banishment from Amiable a sentence too terrible to contemplate. The pain cut so deep for a brief moment she wished to die just to escape it. Finally, she managed to stem the tide to a trickle. Soul-wrenching grief gave way to bleak despair. She lay exhausted on his broad chest, too tired now to even move her head.
“My dear,” he spoke quietly into her ear. “What has happened to make you so unhappy?”
She struggled up, trying to catch her breath. She risked a glance at him and wished she hadn’t. Tears threatened again. “I…I c-came to tell you I no longer r-require your services as escort, Captain Dawson.” There. She had said it. “You may return to London on the morrow, sir.”
“I see.” He held her steady with one hand while the other pushed back a stray wisp of hair straggling from her coiffure. “That would be a most prudent move.” He captured another escaping strand and stroked it into place behind her ear, then wiped her tears away with his thumb.
Could he not see her misery? Would he add to it with his kindness? Such attentions made it almost impossible to continue with her resolve.
“However, I do not think I will go, my lady, if it is all the same to you.”
She fought to keep her composure. “I, however, no longer require your escort, sir. I will journey on alone.”
Amiable smiled patiently but shook his head. “I fear not, my dear.”
“I will.” She tried to pull away from his grasp but he held her still.
“Most definitely not.” He wrapped his hand around the back of her head, urging her face closer to his.
“Wh—what are you doing, Captain Dawson?” His blue eyes were her whole world.
“Bowing to the inevitable, my love.” Then his mouth met hers.







Jenna Jaxon is a multi-published author of historical and contemporary romance.  She has been reading and writing historical romance since she was a teenager.  A romantic herself, she has always loved a dark side to the genre, a twist, suspense, a surprise.  She tries to incorporate all of these elements into her own stories. She lives in Virginia with her family and a small menagerie of pets.  When not reading or writing, she indulges her passion for the theatre, working with local theatres as a director.  She often feels she is directing her characters on their own private stage.

Jenna is a PAN member of Romance Writers of America as well as President of Chesapeake Romance Writers, her local chapter of RWA. Her debut novel, Only Scandal Will Do, is the first in her House of Pleasure series, set in Georgian London. Only Marriage Will Do, the second book in the series, is set to release in mid-June 2015 from Kensington. Her medieval serial novel, Time Enough to Love: Betrothal, Betrayal, and Beleaguered, is a Romeo & Juliet-esque tale, set at the time of the Black Death. The companion short story, Beloveds, released in early June 2015.  And a time travel novella, Crashing Through Time, will release in early July as part of a boxed set about seven plane crashes that lead to love called Crashing Into Love.

She has equated her writing to an addiction to chocolate because once she starts she just can’t stop.


Find Jenna Jaxon online:




: "Georgia",serif; font-size: 22.0pt; line-height: 150%;">BLOG:  https://jennajaxon.wordpress.com/



8 comments:

  1. I'm so looking forward to reading this, Jenna!!

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    1. Thank you, Collette! I hope you enjoy it! :)

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  2. Bowing to the inevitable- way to go!!! Fascinating post.

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    1. I love this post! The pictures are fascinating. The detail incredible.

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    2. Amiable is one who knows which battles to choose. LOL I love Hogarth's sense of what was wrong with society and wasn't afraid to show it. Thanks so much for coming by, Daryl.

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  3. Those photos are amazing. They tell their own tale. If you look at the image of the one with the husband seeking the cure for his VD, the wife also has a spot on her face. I'm glad that wives can marry for love or at least good friendships!

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    Replies
    1. Actually in that engraving the young girl is the husband's mistress and the older woman is her mother. The French pox was rampant during the period and the cure was mercury, a killer in its own right. Not the best of times to live if one lived on the wild side.:) Thanks for coming by, Melissa!

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  4. Liza, thank you so much for hosting me this week!

    ReplyDelete

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